this is a page for

Monthly Archives: April 2017

Character profiles – 9 writing tips

Lots of people write fiction. Some people write it very well. People also write for different reasons: some for themselves, some for their children, and others for a wider audience. One of the key components of any good fiction, and something all writers of this genre will have to learn to master, is character. So, whether you’re writing for yourself, writing for an audience or just perfecting your skills, here’s a few things you can try to get you started (or to add a bit of depth to your existing character profile). 1) Visualise, source or draw your character ideas This might sound silly to some of you but seeing your character can be a great…

The Maze Runner by James Dashner:Review

It’s taken a long time for me to write a review for this one because I wasn’t completely sure how I felt about it. I posted it as one of my favourite reads of the year on Instagram in 2016 but honestly I’d read less than 10 books that year. Title: The Thousandth Floor     [&hellip…

Wolves in BC

Something a bit different today. Me, Taylor and our friend Jack went to the Northern Lights Wolf Centre on the outskirts of Golden, BC and I just felt like writing a little something about our time there. So here’s a crash-course on the fabulous creatures, inarticulately stitched together from the scraps of information I retained. The drive along Highway 1 from Revelstoke to Golden was full of spectacular views and beautiful scenery which was a pretty awesome start to the journey. I’ve always been a lover of animals (especially of the canine variety) so it was an exciting ride and the driving views in BC completely enhance any trip. Wolf- Socialisation We arrived just on…

My reading list

The ‘to-be-read’ list is a mysterious, and uncontrollable thing – it is for me anyway. It’s a many-tentacled monster, growing relentlessly every day. Because of this I’m going to share a few of my reading targets with you – I’m hoping that if I make a list of some of them and share it publicly, I’ll have a better chance of actually getting to a few more than I otherwise might.  Anna Karenina – by Leo Tolstoy This one has been one I’ve wanted to tackle for a good few years but it only resurfaced on my tbr a few weeks ago when I discovered…

The Casual Vacancy by J.K.Rowling: Review

Something a bit different to the usual genre today. It’s been a while since I finished a book and this one did take me a bit longer to get through than a lot of what I’ve been reading recently (though that isn’t necessarily a bad thing). Last month I read only J.K. Rowling novels and I held on to The Casual Vacancy way into the month of April. Title: The Casual  Vacancy                                        Author: J. K. Rowling                                             Date published: September 27th 2012     Pages: 503 Summary:  When Barry Fairbrother dies in his early forties, the town of Pagford is left in shock. Pagford is, seemingly, an English idyll, with a cobbled market square and an…

Genre glue and getting unstuck

On Friday we talked about readers who consume exclusively Young-Adult literature. It’s a good thing to have a favourite genre; specialism is a fabulous thing and is precisely how we get really, really good at the things we love. However, if you’ve got yourself genre stuck and are wanting to experience something a bit different (but maybe aren’t sure where to start) here’s a few handy tips for changing your ways and finding future favourites you never knew existed. I first started thinking about genre in my second year of University; I took a science fiction module because I didn’t fancy anything else that semester. I’d never…

Adults who read YA fiction

“Read whatever you want. But you should feel embarrassed when what you’re reading was written for children.” – Ruth Graham @ Slate.com So, there may be a lot of you out there (past the teenage years and charging into adulthood) who were a little offended by the above statement and enjoy sitting down with books like Divergent,  The Fault in Our Stars, Illuminae and A Court of Thorns and Roses. Well, according to Ruth Graham – a regular contributor to the Slate.com site, we shouldn’t be doing that to ourselves and we are “better than that.” Now I’m not saying she’s not entitled to her opinion but there…